Alert

antihemophilic factor (recombinant)

Pronunciation: ant ee hee moe FIL ik FAK tor (ree KOM bin ant)

Brand: Advate, Adynovate, Afstyla, Eloctate with Fc Fusion Protein, Esperoct, Helixate FS, Jivi, Kogenate FS, Kovaltry, Novoeight, Nuwiq, Recombinate, Xyntha

What is the most important information I should know about recombinant antihemophilic factor?

You should not use this medicine if you have ever had a severe allergic reaction to antihemophilic factor in the past.

Carefully follow all instructions about how to mix and store this medicine. Different brands of recombinant antihemophilic factor may have different storage instructions.

Your body may develop antibodies to antihemophilic factor, making it less effective. Call your doctor if this medicine seems to be less effective in controlling your bleeding.

What is recombinant antihemophilic factor?

Antihemophilic factor (clotting factor) is a naturally occurring protein in the blood. People with hemophilia A have a deficiency in clotting factor VIII. Recombinant antihemophilic factor replaces clotting factor VIII in the blood.

Recombinant antihemophilic factor is used to treat or prevent bleeding episodes in adults and children with hemophilia A. This medicine is sometimes given before a surgery.

Recombinant antihemophilic factor can help prevent joint damage in children who have hemophilia A and no prior joint damage.

Recombinant antihemophilic factor is not for use in treating von Willebrand disease.

Jivi is not approved for use by anyone younger than 12 years old.

Recombinant antihemophilic factor may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before using recombinant antihemophilic factor?

You should not use this medicine if you have ever had a severe allergic reaction to antihemophilic factor, or if you are allergic to mouse or hamster proteins. You should not use Recombinate if you are allergic to beef proteins.

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • heart disease;
  • a latex allergy; or
  • if you have ever been told that you have inhibitors to Factor VIII.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

How should I use recombinant antihemophilic factor?

Your doctor will perform a blood test to make sure recombinant antihemophilic factor is the right treatment for your clotting factor deficiency.

Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose. Always check the strength of the medicine on the label to be sure you are using the correct potency.

Recombinant antihemophilic factor is given as an infusion into a vein. A healthcare provider will give your first dose and may teach you how to properly use the medication by yourself.

Read and carefully follow any Instructions for Use provided with your medicine. Recombinant antihemophilic factor must be mixed with a liquid (diluent) before using it. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you don't understand how to properly mix and store the medicine.

Always wash your hands before preparing and giving your injection.

Prepare an injection only when you are ready to give it. Do not use if the medicine has changed colors or has particles in it. Call your pharmacist for new medicine.

Recombinant antihemophilic factor doses are based on weight. Your dose needs may change if you gain or lose weight.

You will need frequent medical tests.

Your body may develop antibodies to antihemophilic factor, making it less effective. Call your doctor if this medicine seems to be less effective in controlling your bleeding.

Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely. While traveling away from home, be sure you have enough medicine and injection supplies with you.

Store unmixed recombinant antihemophilic factor in the original package in a refrigerator. Do not freeze. Take the medicine out of the refrigerator and let it reach room temperature before preparing your dose.

You may also store unmixed recombinant antihemophilic factor at room temperature, but you must not return it to the refrigerator. Some brands of this medicine can be stored at room temperature for only a certain number of months, or until the expiration date (whichever comes first).

Carefully follow all instructions about how to store this medicine. Different brands of recombinant antihemophilic factor may have different storage instructions.

Do not store in bright light. Do not use past the expiration date on the label.

After mixing the medicine and diluent, keep the mixture at room temperature (not in a refrigerator) and use it within 3 hours.

Each vial (bottle) is for one use only. Throw it away after one use, even if there is still medicine left inside.

Use a needle and syringe only once and then place them in a puncture-proof "sharps" container. Follow state or local laws about how to dispose of this container. Keep it out of the reach of children and pets.

In case of emergency, wear or carry medical identification to let others know you have a bleeding or blood-clotting disorder.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since recombinant antihemophilic factor is used when needed, you may not be on a routine dosing schedule. However, you may need to use the medicine for several days in a row to control a bleeding episode. Keep using the medicine as directed and tell your doctor if your bleeding continues.

Use any missed dose as soon as you remember. Do not use two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while using recombinant antihemophilic factor?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

What are the possible side effects of recombinant antihemophilic factor?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives, itching, rash, numbness, tingling; fever, dizziness, nausea; fast heartbeats, chest tightness, wheezing, difficult breathing; pale skin, cold sweat, feeling light-headed, fainting; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • increased bleeding episodes;
  • any bleeding that will not stop;
  • chest pain; or
  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out.

Common side effects may include:

  • nose bleeds;
  • nausea, vomiting, diarrhea;
  • headache, dizziness;
  • muscle or joint pain;
  • rash;
  • flushing (sudden warmth, redness, or tingly feeling);
  • fever, chills;
  • cough;
  • weakness; or
  • pain, swelling, itching, or redness where the injection was given.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect recombinant antihemophilic factor?

Other drugs may affect recombinant antihemophilic factor, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any medicine you start or stop using.

Where can I get more information?

Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about recombinant antihemophilic factor.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2020 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 8.01. Revision date: 2/19/2020.

Your use of the content provided in this service indicates that you have read, understood and agree to the End-User License Agreement, which can be accessed by End-User License Agreement, which can be accessed by clicking on this link.

Related Locations